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Three Seconds to Win ~ When Sport Was Honest (USSR-USA Gold Basketball, 1972 Olympics)

Warning! You may be shocked and may not believe your eyes at what you’ll see below. It may even turn your entire perception upside down, but keep reading!

Recently we’ve discussed what the sport has turned into in the past 20 or so years: REPORT: Dirty Geopolitics of Olympics and Globalism – Will Russia Say NO and Start Alternative Games? In that report, of December 18, 2017, I said ‘Big sport, simply put, equals the following: big money, big business and big showbiz‘. There is no fairness and no hope of justice in sport at this time in our common reality. Pretty depressing, right?

For someone who grew up with the old ideals of sport it’s hard to watch the mockery and a farce it has become. But I really wanted to have something positive and hopeful with which to #Jumpstart2018, and I found this gem.

True, there may be different vantage points and different interpretations of various events, and there has always been politics and geopolitics present in any Big sport.

You hear me often talk about multidimensional truths and the fact that we are transitioning into 4D. This means that everything that was a norm in 3D is changing. I would hope though, that things like honesty, honor and common decency will remain. It saddens me greatly that in our day and age these solid old notions have almost been rendered obsolete and useless. But let me assure you, they will always remain crucially important in any dimension and in any reality.

You may not believe it, but there was a time when the Olympic sport was honest, at least it made an effort to be so. And it was at the height of the Cold War. 

1972, Munich Summer Olympics. American basketball is the best in the world. In the previous 36 years the US basketball team never lost, and at that moment in history US has won 63 straight games in Olympic competitions. And no wonder. After all, basketball is an original American sport, invented by a US college professor 150 years ago, who tied two fruit baskets in a college court and offered a new sporting competition to his students.

Unexpectedly, the young Soviet basketball team makes it to the Munich Olympic finals, after beating top contenders such as Cuba, to play against the US team. Throughout the game, both USSR and US go neck to neck, at an early point the USSR even being well ahead. After that the USA gains most points back, and again both go head to head. The match is nearly over and the USA is one point ahead, after 2 penalty throws give it 2 extra points. The score is USA 50 — USSR 49. The Soviet coach takes timeout 3 seconds before the end of game.

And then, something crazy begins to happen… Read the rest of this entry

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