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America’s Worst and Most Complained About Banks

I was just doing some research and stumbled upon this article in magnifymoney.com.

They also post the best and most current CD rates in the US: Find it here.

I thought it would be useful and appropriate to let you all know about this, since big changes in the global banking are coming and I’ll be soon doing an article on Patreon on that. Read: Banking Industry Overhaul Timeline: Saturn in Capricorn (preview).

Of course, take everything with a grain of salt and always do your own research when it comes to financial matters, don’t just believe anyone’s word! Still, this is useful info. As for me, I had closed all my accounts with the likes of Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan, and any other major banks a long time ago, and never looked back.

This article is by Nick Clements (article’s direct link: magnifymoney.com). It is from 2014, however, the info remains current and some data is very notable. Here is an excerpt:

‘Most Complained About Banks – We crunched the numbers’

  • Bank of America remains America’s most complained about bank
  • Ocwen has rapidly become America’s most complained about mortgage servicer. (Not surprising, given the mistakes they have made. If you are a customer, you could get money back from them. Find out more here.)
  • Citibank Credit Cards have the highest complaint ratio (complaints as a % of total credit cards)
  • Capital One received the most retail bank complaints per branch (with Bank of America a close second)
  • Experian is the most complained about credit bureau
  • Encore Capital Group is the most complained about debt collector

If you are having a problem with your bank, you can get help with your complaint from the CFPB (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau). Just file your complaint online, and they will help you get answers – and maybe even money. I told the story of my friend, who had his credit history fixed and money reimbursed, in this DailyFinance article. The CFPB has received over 400,000 complaints since it was launched, providing a real alternative for people to get help.

The CFPB makes its complaint database public. To date, over 250,000 complaints have been made public (and more are being added to the database every day). At MagnifyMoney, we believe that public access to complaint data is a great public service. It enables people like us to identify trends, rank banks based upon complaints, and help consumers make good financial decisions.

Today we are pleased to release our analysis of the complaint database.

Over 76,000 complaints were made public during the first six months of the year. Of the big four banks, Bank of America remains the most complained about bank. 5,261 people complained about BofA. Wells Fargo received 4,834 complaints. Chase received 3,988 complaints and Citibank received 3,025.

What does this mean for you?

We have crunched the complaint numbers, and have the following tips:

  1. If Ocwen is your mortgage servicer (now the largest non-bank servicer in the country), you should pay close attention. They have a history of mistakes, which can be very costly. If you are having problems with Ocwen, don’t be shy. Complain to the CFPB, and tell Ocwen that you are going to complain to the CFPB. They are a bit touchy, given they have just been punished with a judgment of more than $2 billion due to their mistakes.

  2. If you are receiving calls from a collection agency, you have rights. And if someone like Encore Capital Group keeps calling you – and you don’t know why – don’t be afraid to raise the issue to the CFPB (and tell Encore that you are doing so).

  3. For choosing a retail bank, we have long argued that branch-free banking is the way to go. Traditional banks pay the lowest rates on savings accounts, charge the highest monthly and overdraft fees, and limit you to their ATM network. Look at our checking account and savings account pages to make your checking account free, earn the highest interest on your savings account, and ditch your traditional bank. Of the big banks, Chase has half as many complaints per branch at BofA. And PNC and US Bancorp always did well.

  4. Credit bureaus can make mistakes. You should check your credit report every year, and make sure that mistakes aren’t there. You are allowed to get a free report every year from all three bureaus, and make sure you do. To get the issue fixed, you can go straight to the bureau. But, if they don’t move quickly enough, use the CFPB.

  5. The biggest complaint categories for credit cards are billing disputes and ID fraud. Sign up for alerts with your credit card company (they can send you an email if a large purchase is made). You should also download your bank’s app so that you can keep an eye on spending. Any suspicious activity should be reported immediately – and you should keep a paper trail of your communication with your bank. The earlier you catch anything suspicious, the better.

Lada’s 2 cents:

So, according to the above report, the most complained about banks are Bank of America, Citi, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan, Capital One — all ‘too big to fail’ major multinationals. Bank of America alone had over 38,000 complaints registered.

The regions with most registered complaints: Washington, DC; Miami, FL; Atlanta, GA.

*** If you are interested in my predictions for the US/West’s banking industry and financial system situation for 2018-2020, support Lada Ray on Patreon!

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Read more Banking Industry Overhaul Timeline: Saturn in Capricorn (preview)

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Destroying the Economy: Rigged Wall Street System of Daily Fraud

This post is a fusion of the two different media items of interest regarding the rigged Wall Street financial system with my own thoughts on the subject as former Smith Barney financial consultant.

I’ve included the new #KeiserReport on #RT with Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert, which addresses only a couple of the many rigged games Wall Street plays these days, thus sucking resources and life out of the US economy, as well as the economies of other countries. These two are: 1. “high-frequency trading” and 2. “insider trading.” While the latter is well-known, the former being a fraud may be a surprise for some. How does high-frequency trading work? Max Keiser gives us his primer. In the second half Max interviews Doug Casey about investing and its secrets. One of the interesting points is about Argentina, which again seems to be in a pre-default crisis.

I worked on Wall Street as financial consultant for Salomon Smith Barney (at the time, the investment banking arm of Citigroup), and I left because I was disgusted with its dirty innerworkings. However,  several years ago even I couldn’t imagine the degree to which the game would be rigged today… Max and Stacy like to talk about the JP Morgan CEO, Jamie Dimon, and his role in the rigging of the system, which will eventually lead to its collpse. When I worked at Smith Barney, Jamie Dimon was one of the top honchos at Citigroup, who was tipped for the next CEO’s position. However, he ubruptly left in the end of 1990s (was fired?) after a mystery row with Citi’s then CEO, Sandy Weill. Read the rest of this entry

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