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Watch Morozko (Father Frost) and Other Favorite Russian New Year’s Fairytales and Songs

NEW YEAR’S TREAT FOR MY READERS! 

New Year is the year’s biggest holiday in Russia. There are lots of very good movies, cartoons, concerts and various songs/performances that are dedicated to it.

One of the eternal classics is the old Russian fairytale made into a film in 1964, MOROZKO, for some reason translated to English as Jack Frost, but better translated as Father Frost.

Watch MOROZKO here with English subs! (TIP: if your Eng subs don’t work, click on CC button on the bottom right of your Youtube screen.)

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This is an equally lovely Soviet classic (1956, film length animation). Nowadys they say, with a nostalgic sigh, about such films: ‘They don’t make them like this any more!’

Fairytale TWELVE MONTHS (watch with Eng subs):

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Another old classic (1952, film length animation): SNEGUROCHKA (The Snow Maiden). Snegurochka is considered the granddaughter of Ded Moroz (Grandfather Frost). As all Russian films and fairytales, it carries important life’s lessons and wise revelations.

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A couple of uplifting New Year’s songs from the fantasy film CHARODEI (Wizards) produced at the Odessa Movie Studio in 1984. These songs are also classics with huge following throughout the world.

‘Three White Horses’ (the three white horses in this case mean December, January and February – reflecting the symbolism of the legendary Russian Troika):

‘Snezhinka’ (snow flake), or ‘While the clock strikes Midnight’

 

Enjoy, everyone!

There are lots of other great movies and cartoons. I’ll share them in the future – stay tuned!

C Новым Годом 2016!

S NOVIM GODOM! HAPPY NEW YEAR!

S-Novim-godom sparkle 2

 

 

Hoaxes, Hoaxes: Sevastopol Officer in Syria and BBC Moon Landing Hoax Doc. Plus, Must Watch Russian Films

Several interesting updates from a friend of FuturisTrendcast, Nemo, which deserve our attention:

Nemo1024

The latest in the parade of anti-Russian Syria-centered hoaxes: Someone broke into a social-network account of a wife of a naval officer serving in Sevastopol. The site is a pre-natal one, where the woman was sharing the experience with her ongoing pregnancy. She never posted anything related to her husband’s work there. And then came a post, telling that her husband is off to danger to remote Syria. This post was picked-up, making headlines, while her account got deleted. I watched the interview with the officer in question, who is (big surprise) still in Sevastopol, and I admire his restraint in commenting the outrageous incident that targeted his family.

Also, as Patricia noted in a comment above, even IF this was not a hoax, what were we meant to think reading this news? That “bad Russia” sends its troops to fight against “good ISIS”, which destroys Syria?

More: Evil Empire Strikes Again: US Pressures Greece to block Russian Syria-bound Aid Planes. Also more good info in the comment section.

Though I am unsure if it can be ascribed to BBC, the following documentary covers all the aspects of the Moon landing hoax and brings a lot of interesting historical footage.

Lada’s two cents:

Yes, I have seen this documentary a while back. It is from BBC.

Much more interesting stuff in: 500th Soyuz Launch: Russia, USA, China, Fake Moon Landing, Space Travel and Aquarian Age. Don’t miss the comments, where I answer a lot of cutting edge questions.

Must see Russian movies

Lada, I discovered a wonderful trilogy of films with Georgij Zhzhenov (Георгий Жжёнов). The films are Путь в «Сатурн» (Way into “Saturn”), Конец «Сатурна» (The End of “Saturn”), and Бой после победы (The Battle after the Victory). They are from 1968 and 1972.

The first two films are about integration of a Soviet intelligence officer into German sub-division of Abwehr, “Saturn”, which was preparing saboteurs that were sent out against Soviet union during WWII. But it is the third film that completely fascinated me. WWII ends and the German officers are taken prisoner in the American zone, the Soviet intelligence officer is among them. He is about to disclose himself and return home, but suddenly the German officers are pulled from the POW camp and are formed into a division working on creation of saboteurs on the Soviet-controlled territory, as well as Baltics and Ukraine, by the American friends. And the Soviet officers continues to be undercover collecting information and trying to prevent a large sabotage operation on the day when Berlin is divided. The film is much more nuanced than what I describe here, with both Germans and Americans having fleshed-out human characters.

There is one scene that caught my attention, when one of the Soviet generals in the centre says that, god knows, they did everything in their power to keep Berlin united. That’s in the film from 1972.

Lada, this film is something worth writing an extended article about, as it uncannily seems to echo the events of this year – rather the current result of something that began in 1945.

I found only short fragments of the third film on YouTube, while the first two can be found in full. None of them are, alas, translated.

The fragment below shows the opening and the first minutes of the film, when the retreating German convoy with documents carrying “Saturn’s” archives, learns about Germany’s capitulation.

Video: Бой после победы.trailer

Also, found this movie:

“We Are From the Future” (Мы из будущего) in two parts on Rutube:

Lada’s two cents:

Thanks for all the great comments, Nemo. The Saturn trilogy sounds very promising.

I had posted WE ARE FROM THE FUTURE on the Rus Films page once, as one of the recommended movies. But it got deleted from YT, so I had to remove the link. Thanks for these new links. Thank goodness for Rutube. 😉

Incidentally, part 2 of this film is – surprise!! – about Banderovtsi ukro-nazis and the stark prediction that there is a danger of them taking over Ukraine. This is the theme as far as I know, since I didn’t see part 2. But I can attest that part 1 is great. At the time part 2 came out in late 2000s, it drew a lot of criticism. The author was blamed for being anti-Ukrainian and accused of prejudice against Ukraine.

Fast-forward just a few short years to 2014 – and what do we have? The movie’s prediction comes true completely; Bandera ukro-nazis take over Ukraine, the whole nine yards. The mentality turnaround of Russia’s young generation, as well as the rise of patriotism and remembrance of the ancestral roots is also a big theme in the film. Don’t know about part 3 (didn’t know it existed), but parts 1 and 2 are intensely prophetic.

My synopsis from the FT’s Russian Films page:

Time Travel/Adventure: We Are From the Future

Rating 4.5 stars. Newer Russian movie, 2008. A fantastic story of time travel by 4 young men, who don’t care about their country’s past and its heroes, and who make money by digging up and selling to foreigners its memory: they find WWII era battlefields and scavenge any trophies they can find.

(The image of the young not caring about their country’s past is deeply symbolic. We can see this condition manifesting in its worst form today in Ukraine.)

During one such treasure hunt, the four young men dig out a war trench, but instead of returning home with valuables, they find themselves in the middle of a real WWII battle, where they first become German prisoners, and later Russian prisoners. Russians eventually believe that they aren’t the enemy, but they have to learn the hard way what their ancestors had to go through during the war.

In the end, they make it back into their time, having learned their lessons – as very different men.

Lots more highly recommended Rus movies on Russian Films page

I explain more about the Moon landing hoax, the logic behind it, how it was done and why it was discontinued; the truth about Appollo 13, and what Russia was doing at the time, in COMMENTS.

#Victory70 Special: The Invisible War of WWII on Film

This post is part of the 70 YEARS OF THE GREAT VICTORY MARATHON

#Victory70 

Happy Victory Day!

Today, on May 9th, a massive Victory Parade takes place on Red Square and in other 25 cities all over Russia. See my coverage here: #Victory70 May 9th Red Square and All Russia Victory Day Parades Marathon

These parades are full of well-trained troops and impressive new hardware, as well as historic T-34 tanks from the Great Patriotic War. Also, there is a new tradition, called “The Immortal Regiment.” Overall 12 million people in Russia and beyond took part in the Immortal Regiment marches. This was a sight to behold. A boundless sea of people participated in Moscow, carrying pictures of their relatives who perished in the war. Putin joined, carrying a photo of his father.

‘Immortal Regiment’ march: Putin joins huge crowd paying tribute to WW2 soldiers

#БессмертныйПолк #ImmortalRegiment

While big battles with many casualties, tragedy and loss played out for six difficult years on the fronts of the most devastating war humans have ever known, I want to talk about another war – the war that was invisible to all but a few; the kind of war that dramatically shifted the balance of power on the planet. It was the war that helped ensure Victory Day.

You all know that I love to write spy thrillers. In fact, my thrillers are about spies by accident and out of necessity. GOLD TRAIN (Accidental Spy Russia Adventure) is about American journalist Jade Snow who goes to Moscow to re-discover her deep Russian roots and to get that bomb of a story; instead she finds herself between the rock and the hard place when duty and curiosity draw her to unravel a major conspiracy. THE EARTH SHIFTER, usually called a mystical thriller, has a significant spy thriller component. Sasha’s father Professor Maxim Elfimov happens to also be a master remote viewer and unbeknownst to him, he is husband to a spy. He becomes a spy in order to avenge his wife and protect his daughter, whose destiny is to become the Earth Shifter.

What can I say, I love spies. When I was barely 10, I often found myself inventing spy thriller stories in my head. I also love watching very intelligently made spy movies. Probably the best movies I’ve even seen in this genre were Soviet ones. Today, I want to share two of the best TV mini-series ever made.

Seventeen Moments of Spring (Russian: Семнадцать мгновений весны).

semnadzat mgnoveniy vesni

It was filmed at Gorky Film Studio, directed by Tatyana Lioznova and based on the book with the same title by the novelist Yulian Semyonov. The series comprises 12 episodes 70 minutes each. Starring Russian screen legend Vyacheslav Tikhonov. Other leading roles were performed by Leonid Bronevoy, Oleg Tabakov, Yuri Vizbor, Yevgeniy Yevstigneyev, Rostislav Plyatt, Vasily Lanovoy, and Mikhail Zharkovsky.

When the new episode of this film was on, streets got empty as everyone – young and old – were glued to their screens. Crime was generally very low in the USSR, but police reported that during Seventeen Moments of Spring it became non-existent, as even criminals had taken to watching it. The movie made an indelible impression, especially when it first came out. It painted a realistic and profound picture of Germany and Europe during the burning hot Spring 1945. It includes some real documentary footage of WWII battles, as well as Hitler and other historic figures of that time, embedded in the film. Real documents of those days are presented, as well as fictional documents based on real historic events. The film was masterminded in such a way as to seem like a documentary, therefore, it was originally black and white, to coincide with the documentary footage and appear more realistic. A color version was also made.

Historic Fact: As the Russian army approaches Berlin, in March 1945 Soviet leadership finds out that someone in Hitler’s closest inner circle is trying to sign a unilateral surrender with the supposed Soviet ally USA, bypassing USSR, who has done most of the work and suffered by far most casualties in the war against fascism. The secret negotiator for the US was Allen Dulles and negotiations did take place on March 8, 1945 in Switzerland. It becomes clear that many of the Nazi criminals who committed despicable acts on the territory of the USSR and who, according to the allied agreement, are supposed to be tried by the international tribunal, may avoid retribution as they will be quietly whisked away to the USA, while most of the Nazi power structures are kept intact behind the Russians’ backs. The operation was codenamed both Operation Sunrise and Operation Crossword (“Sunrise Crossword” in the film).

Berlin is already being bombed. Soviet leadership contacts the deep cover agent implanted into the Nazi regime since 1920s, who goes by the name Standartenführer SS Otto von Stierlitz, known to only a few in Moscow as Colonel Maxim Isaev. He was probably the highest placed Russian agent in Nazi Germany and Schellenberg’s protegé. Stierlitz must find out who exactly is behind these secret negotiations. As the news get more and more alarming, the Russian agent must also derail unilateral surrender plans. How, that’s the question.

As Stierlitz tries to figure out whether it’s Himmler, Goebbels or Bormann who are attempting to sign the surrender, there are unforseen complications. During US/UK bombing of Berlin, Stierlitz’ radio-criptographer is killed and his pregnant wife, his second radio specialist, is wounded and captured by Gestapo. As he attempts to solve the mystery of who is behind the negotiations, derail American plans and at the same time save his assistant, Stierlitz must find alternative ways of delivering his messages. A multi-layered cat and mouse game begins as he is also being investigated by Gestapo. The plot thickens…

As we know from history, the unilateral surrender never happened, thanks to that Soviet officer whose true name will never be known. Seventeen Moments of Spring is a fictionalized account; names and circumstances have been modified. However, the events described in the film did take place and the unilateral surrender almost became a reality.

semnadzat mgnoveniy vesni 2

I have found this movie on YouTube with English subtitles! Please go to this channel.  The video of each episode is divided into seven segments. Scroll down the playlists for earlier episodes as they are in reverse order.

LINK to PLAYLIST 1: Episodes 1-6

LINK to PLAYLIST 2: Episodes 2-12

This movie, like most Russian movies, has great songs and music score. Watch clip and listen to the famous song, Somewhere Far Away.

Shield and Sword (Russian: Щит и меч)

Filmed at Mosfilm in 1968, it consists of 4 episodes. Starring Russian screen legends Stanislav Lyubshin as deep cover Russian agent Johann Weiss (aka Alexandr Belov) and Oleg Yankovsky as a spoiled rich brat turned anti-fascist Heinrich Schwarzkopf. Also made in black and white to represent the era.

A modest and helpful auto mechanic Johann Weiss is a so-called Volksdeutsche, or ethnic German living in Riga, Latvia circa 1940. But that’s only his cover. In reality, he is Russian Alexandr Belov. Many Germans living in Latvia are thinking about repatriating to Germany as the smell of the upcoming war is getting stronger. Johann’s best client is wealthy engineer and inventor Schwarzkopf. His son Heinrich is also a client and an unlikely friend, despite the difference in social stature.

Engineer Schwarzkopf is very valuable to both sides. Germans are convincing him to move back to Germany to help out arming and equipping the growing German army. Suddenly, Schwarzkopf Sr. is killed. Johann learns that a day prior engineer received Soviet citizenship and was planning on moving to Moscow. Afraid that the formiddable knowledge and secrets in his head would become Russian property, local leader of German Nazis has ordered him killed; however, aloud he says that it was USSR that took him out because he was planning on moving to Berlin.

Devasted Heinrich decides to move to Berlin and Johann follows. Heinrich’s influential uncle gets Johann a lucrative placement in German intelligence, Abwehr. Johann’s career skyrockets as he proves to be a very helpful and level-headed officer.

shield and sword

Johann (Lyubshin) left, Heinrich (Yankovsky) right

Meanwhile, as Heinrich observes Nazi atrocities, he gets more and more disgusted. He starts doubting the official story of his father’s death. Eventually, Johann’s friends show him proof of his father’s Soviet citizenship and his assassination by Germans. Heinrich becomes double agent now working directly with Johann.

The movie includes a universally beloved song “Where does the Motherland Begin?” as well as others. I wish I could post the song here, but Mosfilm doesn’t allow the embedding of its videos. It’s a very beautiful melody, and lyrics are simply stellar. Here is the video of this song, with a great clip from Shield and Sword, in memory of Oleg Yankovsky (С чего начинается родина – памяти Олега Янковского).

Unfortunately, I could only find Shield and Sword in Russian:

Episode 1   Episode 2    Episode 3    Episode 4

Both films are based on true stories of real Russian spies.

You can find more Russian songs of the Great Victory here

More movies about the Great War here

Link to the immortal song The Cranes in: 

Happy Victory Day, Fr. Merkel! My Open Postcard to the German Chancellor

Additionally, check out the comment section for some very good and important comments: “Victory Day – it’s a holiday with tears in our eyes!” This is the song that became the anthem of Victory Day and a symbol of the Great Victory. Lyrics are beautiful! Listen to the song and read English translation here: Nemo1024

See all posts 70 Years of Great Victory

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Read EARTH SHIFT REPORTS on Ladaray.info

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Subscribe: LADA RAY youtube channel

Raising Chi Against Hatred: The Suppressed Story of Russian Songs that Unite World Cultures

That’s it! I am sick and tired of all the negativity, confusion and fighting going on between people and countries in this world! I declare a CHI-RAISING POSITIVITY DAY!

This is the post that will remind those who have forgotten, and open the eyes for those who have never heard it before. Simply put, below are some Soviet songs that are beautiful and famous in their own right, performed by some of the best voices you’ll ever hear. But there is something else about these songs that catches the eye: by their very existence they UNITE people, cultures and countries. The unique culture I am proud to have been born into had succeeded in performing a miracle no one else had been able to accomplish. At least for a short while we managed to unite different cultures in friendship and cooperation, instead of hatred and war! And that, in my book, IS the highest accomplishment this entire human civilization was ever able to achieve!

Since the Russian realm is such a UNIFYING force in the world, this is exactly why the West/NWO  is itching to destroy it. Don’t believe me? Read and listen below – and judge for yourself! Perhaps those of my readers who are non-English speakers will easily recognize these gems from their childhood. The reason I am also confident my many English-speaking readers won’t know the songs below is because there always was a full-scale blockade of the Russian culture in the West, also referred to as the Iron Curtain. The reason the Iron Curtain was necessary was because the Russian ideas of friendship and cooperation were always too popular for the liking of  the West. If such ideas took hold and people all over the world suddenly stopped fighting, how would they divide and conquer?

Warning, this is NOT American pop – this is live, positive, highly calibrated singing! Note: designation “Song of the Year” was given in the Soviet Union to the best songs written that specific year in the entire Soviet space.

In the Soviet Union, the ugly civil war based on pathological hatred taking place today in Ukraine, or in Nagorny Kharabakh (between Azerbaijan and Armenia), or such as was the 2008 war between South Ossetia/Georgia, or the frozen conflict between Moldova and Pridnestrovie, would have never happened. And if someone tells you that Russians oppressed other nationalities in the USSR, don’t believe such complete and total BS. I was there. It was, in fact, the other way around – Russians promoted every possible and impossible national minority, well before it became politically correct to do so in the US and EU. Sometimes, Russians did it to their own disadvantage.

But don’t believe me – just listen to the songs and watch videos below. Once you do, everything will become ‘crystal clear,’ as they say in Russia.

MEGA PARADE OF POSITIVE RUSSIAN SONGS THAT HAVE THE POWER TO UNITE!

Our Parents’ Home (the beginning of all beginnings) – ‘Родительский дом, начало начал.’ This is one of the lyrical gems from the 1970s. Performed by the famed buttery voice of the Soviet/Russian stage, Lev Leshchenko, who’s, as his last name indicates, is of Ukrainian heritage.

Nightingale Grove – Лев Лещенко, Соловьиная роща. (Nightingale is the national Russian bird). One of the famous songs of the 1970s. Older, but still popular, Lev Leshchenko singing in 2008. Russian lyrics

Echo of Love –  Song of the Year 1977. Эхо любви – Performed by Polish singer Anna German and Russian singer of Ukrainian heritage, Lev Leshchenko – Анна Герман и Лев Лещенко

Lyrics: “And even in the land of the crawling darkness, beyond the circle of death, I know we won’t part – we are an echo, we are an echo, we are each other’s eternal memory.”

Hope – Надежда, Song of the Year 1975 – Polish singer Anna German, who was equally loved in Russia/USSR, singing the famous Russian song. Анна Герман

Melody – Song of the Year 1976 – performed by Muslim Magomaev, Azerbaijani singer, famous for his performances of Russian songs, who became the national treasure of Russia. Муслим Магомаев “Мелодия” 1976

The Best City on Earth (a song about Moscow – video with rare footage of the 1980s Moscow). Again by Azerbaijani singer Muslim Magomaev. Муслим Магомаев – Лучший город Земли

All the above songs, and some below as well, had been written by prolific Russian composer Alexandra Pakhmutova, lyrics by Russian poet Nikolay Dobronravov.

Belovezhskaya Pushcha – Song of the Year 1975 ( beautiful song about Bleovezhskaya Pushcha, or Forest – a massive nature preserve in Belarus which is famous for its unique flora and fauna and is a World Heritage site) – Performed by Belorussian band Pesnyari, famous for their high pitch, flowing voices. When I was little, the entire Soviet Union sang this song from the tiny republic of Belarus.

Vologda – Song of the Year 1976 (song about a Russian town called Vologda). Performed by Belorussian band Pesnyari. 

Love Happened – Song of the Year 1979. By Kazakh singer Rosa Rimbaeva. Роза Рымбаева, “Любовь настала” Песня года – 1979

Maestro – early 1980s. Performed by the famous Russian singer Alla Pugacheva together with author, Latvian composer Raimond Pauls. Lyrics by Jewish/Russian poet, Ilya Reznik. Алла Пугачева и Раймонд Паулс – Маэстро.

A Million of Crimson Roses – 1983. Performed by Russian singer Alla Pugacheva. Author, Latvian composer Raimond Pauls. Milion Alykh Roz

Snow (Sneg) – contemporary song, performed by 8-year-old Anastasia Petrik from Odessa, Ukraine & famous Russian pop-singer Philip Kirkorov, from Bulgaria.

Alyosha –  Алёша – 1970s. Performed by Bulgarian singers Г. Николова, Г. Кордов. Authors: Jewish/Russian composer Kolmanovsky, lyrics by Russian poet Vanshenkin. Legendary song about the monument to the Russian soldier, dubbed ‘Alyosha,’ who died freeing Bulgaria from fascism.

Here Birds Don’t Sing (aka, We Need One Victory) – legendary song from the 1970s film Belorussian Station about a reunion of several Great War vets, as they recall the old days and face new challenges. Performed by Armenian singer Зара, 2009. Music/lyrics by legendary Georgian author and singer, Bulat Okudzhava.  Здесь птицы не поют. “Спасибо вам за Победу!”

Come Back, Forest Deer – performed by the Russian singer of Gypsy origin Aida Vedishcheva.

I Like It That You Aren’t Ill With Me – 1970s. Мне нравится что вы больны не мною. This is one of the songs from the beloved, world-famous mega-hit movie by Russian director Eldar Ryazanov Irony of Fate, or Enjoy your Bath. I mention this movie on my Russian Films page and give it 5+ stars. Song performed by Russian Alla Pugacheva, starring are Polish actress Barbara Brylska (on screen) and Russian actor Andrey Myagkov.  Music by Armenian composer born in Georgia, Mikael Tariverdiev. Original poetry by Russian poet, Anna Akhmatova.

Link to YT video (I just discovered that Mosfilm, who owns the rights, regretfully doesn’t allow the re-blogging of videos. I feel this is awfully shortsighted as all I am doing is promoting their work and the Russian culture. Too bad).

Somewhere Far Away – 1970s. Где-то далеко: Штирлиц встреча с женой. Song from the amazing series about the Russian spy in nazi Germany, 17 Moments of Spring (17 мгновений весны). Starring AMAZING Russian/Soviet actor Viacheslav Tikhonov. Written by Armenian composer born in Georgia, Mikael Tariverdiev. Song performed by Jewish/Soviet singer Iosif Kobzon.

(Also just discovered! Same goes for ‘Quiz group pro’ that appears to own the rights to this video, although I have no idea who they are. They also don’t allow blog reposting. I strongly feel these movies are the heritage of all Russian people, not of some obscure group set up in the restrictive Western way. By denying the fair use/non-profit re-posting, they don’t help anyone. I feel this is terribly shortsighted as all I am doing is promoting their work and the Russian culture). Link to YT video, if anyone’s interested.

In the future, I will have no choice other than to delete videos that have become restricted, as I have no time to repost links. This is a vivid illustration of how Russian showbiz has become way too westernized for their own good, and the good of the world. By such shortsightedness they are hurting no one but themselves. A vivid confirmation of everything I’ve been saying in my articles.

The world-famous Farewell of Slavianka (“Прощание Славянки”) subtitles in Russian/English. Wartime song, contemporary performance, 2010, by Armenian singer Zara and Russian actor Dmitry Pevtsov.

 

I Don’t Regret – Мне не жаль – Soundtrack from the acclaimed 2000s TV series, Poor Nastya, about Russian aristocrats, simple people, and young Alexander, future Emperor Alexander II. Brilliant song performed by Russian singers Arina and Anton Makarsky, and Russian-Korean Sergei Lee.

Darkey, the Moldavian Girl, or simply, Darkey. Famous song from movie Only Old Men Are Going to Battle. The movie is about a unit of military pilots during the Great War, who like to sing. The unit is very international, and its members are Russian, Georgian, Armenian, Ukrainian , Kazakh, etc.

Stadium of Our Dreams (Stadion Moei Mechti) – Very worth watching! The music that unites the world – rare footage of the Opening Ceremony of the 1980 Moscow Olympics. Performed by Azerbaizhani singer Muslim Magomayev. During the ceremony, the giant flags of all 15 Soviet republics were carried in by groups of ethnic girls dressed in respective national costumes. Check out the symbolism! Also watch the parade of the Soviet Olympic winners! USSR only started participating in the Olympics in 1952. Watch how many winners and how many medals they already had by 1980! USSR usually swept the entire Olympics, both Summer and Winter!

Do you think that MAYBE the West was jealous? Do you think that MAYBE they were afraid, and that MAYBE they wanted to weaken the Soviet Union?

Farewell, Gentle Misha – So worth watching! The legendary 1980 Moscow Olympics closing ceremony song. With rare footage of the giant mascot, Misha the Bear, shedding a tear and flying into the sky. Beautiful song with Lev Leshchenko.

And this is an episode from the amazing 2014 Sochi Olympics closing ceremony. The grandson of the 1980 Mishka and his friends, Zaika the Hare and Snow Leopard, are closing the Games. Watch Mishka blow out the flame and again shed a tear. Beautiful music score by Russian composer Eduard Artemiev, 1974 – from film: Svoi Sredi Chuzhikh, Chuzhoi Sredi Svoikh – At Home Among Strangers.

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For desert, I thought it would be nice to add some foreign performances of the famous Russian songs:

Farewell of Slavianka – performed by the king’s orchestra of the Royal Guard of Norway. Impressive Russian, by the way.

Farewell of Slavianka in Chinese

Farewell of Slavianka, Hebrew version (Israel)

Sacred War in Russian and Chinese – Choir of the People’s Army of the Republic of China

Katyusha in Chinese

Katyusha in Hebrew, Israel

Kalina in Bloom – China’s First Lady singing in Chinese and Russian, Ой, цветет калина.

By the Sea, by the Blue Sea  in Japanese. У МОРЯ У СИНЕГО МОРЯ.

A Million of Crimson Roses – Alla Pugacheva’s song performed in Korean

Blue Carriage in Japanese – Голубой вагон.  The beloved song of my childhood from the legendary children’s cartoon series, Adventures of Cheburashka, (Cheburashka is the beloved children’s character; for luck, Cheburashka toys accompany Russian athletes to every Olympics)

For comparison’s sake, this is the original Blue Carriage in Russian – Голубой вагон

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